5 Books By Black Women You Should Read Instead of “The Handmaid’s Tale”

By B.J. Wright • Originally published on Calypsoul • In December 2018, the Black Feminist Collective published a short essay by Kiarran T.L. Diaz titled, “Why The Handmaid’s Tale is Problematic”. Now, I’ve never read the book or watched the show, and while Diaz’s critique focused explicitly on the Hulu original series, I’ve come to find that there is usually nothing lost in the translation of white narratives from literature to film.

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Sci-Fi As Accessible Movement Building: A Review of “The Tiger Flu” by Larissa Lai

By Chloe Dunston • The Tiger Flu is set in the year 2145, which author Larissa Lai depicts as a “time after oil” divided by factions, gender, disease and technology. After years of greedy leadership, environmental degradation, and the exhaustion of fossil fuels, Saltwater City and its outskirts stand alone in what was formerly Vancouver, Canada.

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Bodies and Forcefulness: The Experience of Blackness in the work of Delphine Desane

By Mariana Álvarez Castillo • Originally published on Afroféminas • Delphine Desane (B. 1988) places moments of her world in limbos of colors: from her experience as a Black woman in Europe, she brings situations, outfits, faces and hair to the canvas. With flat colored backgrounds and penetrating gazes, Delphine makes visible the Black corporality that surrounds her, from a place that involves the intimate, the meditative and the forceful.

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Review: Little Fires Everywhere

By Stephanie Younger • Little Fires Everywhere is a limited series on Hulu, based on the book authored and published in 2017 by Celeste Ng, that aired from March 2020 to April 2020. The series takes place in 1997, and begins when Mia Warren (Kerry Washington), an itinerant artist and her daughter Pearl (Lexi Underwood) move to a property in a liberal, wealthy neighborhood in Shaker Heights, Ohio.

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Queer Windows in Dembow Music

By Princess Jiménez • Originally published on Kultwatch • In the Dominican Republic, where supposedly moral society and the Church often espouse virulent homophobia and transphobia, an unusual alliance has appeared among the very poorest: singers and producers of popular music genre Dembow are working with queer people and trans women, who have become huge stars in their own right.

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Review: MTV’s Documentary “White People”

By Raina Cornish • Racial profiling, “color blindness”, racist crimes, hatred. These are all issues that are making the world more divided than ever. People always say that we need to stop history from repeating itself, but how can we stop it if we continue to add fuel to the fire of racism and bias to other races?

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Why ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ is Problematic

By Kiarran T.L. Diaz • In the age of “wokeness,” TV shows, and media alike are rushing to find a way to sell their ideas to people who are tired of the nonsense. Different shows, movies, and books try to align themselves with diversity by trying to take shortcuts left and right.

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Movie Review: The Hate U Give

By Stephanie Younger • The Hate U Give is a movie based on the acclaimed YA novel by Angie Thomas. Directed by George Tillman Jr., the movie opens with 16-year-old Starr Carter’s (Amandla Stenberg) narrating her recollection of being given “the talk” by her formerly-incarcerated father Maverick (Russell Hornsby), on how to survive encounters with the police.

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Book Review: “The Hate U Give” by Angie Thomas

By Stephanie Younger • Originally published on HCPL TeenScene’s Read & Review • A 16-year-old Black teen who has witnessed the two fatal shootings of her childhood best friends, tries to make sense of the world. Starr Carter witnessed the first shooting when she was ten.

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14 Black Girls, Women & Non-binary People Every Intersectional Feminist Should Know About

By Stephanie Younger • Last month, I made a short video that celebrates the intersections of Black history & feminist history. Why both? Many institutions fail to educate people about Black liberation and the feminist movement from the narratives Black women, Black girls and Black non-binary people, who have fortified our movements in such powerful ways, but are often discredited for their work on the frontlines of Black liberation—which is often centered around cishet Black men, and mainstream feminism—which often centers cishet white women.

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