About

Since creating Black Feminist Collective in 2017, Stephanie Younger has been passionate about womanism, and she is an 18-year-old who fights for a world free of prisons and without the police.

Articles by this Author

Black People Can’t Wait Every Four Years for Our Liberation

By Stephanie Younger • Demanding labor from Black youth is rooted the anti-Black idea that our worthiness relies on what we do and how much we do, which affects the fight for our liberation. White feminists often bully young Black feminists into electing our way towards liberation. There are so many Black youth like myself … Continue reading Black People Can’t Wait Every Four Years for Our Liberation

A Black Feminist Resource List

Books Ain’t I a Woman? by bell hooks (1981) In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens: Womanist Prose by Alice Walker (1983) Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde (1984) Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center by bell hooks (1984) Critical Race Theory: The Key Writings that Formed the Movement by Kimberle Crenshaw (1995) Are Prisons Obsolete? by … Continue reading A Black Feminist Resource List

A Call-to-Action to “Well-Intentioned” White Liberals From a Black Girl in the Capital of the Confederacy

By Stephanie Younger • On June 3rd, I spoke in front of a crowd comprised of thousands of protesters at the Lee Statue in Richmond, Virginia. I began by READING an excerpt from Dr. Martin Luther King’s “Letter From a Birmingham Jail” (the part where he said that he is “gravely disappointed with the white … Continue reading A Call-to-Action to “Well-Intentioned” White Liberals From a Black Girl in the Capital of the Confederacy

Analysis: The Movement that Cancelled R. Kelly

By Stephanie Younger • CW: This article has descriptions of sexual violence. Could a hashtag topple the career of a popular artist? Hashtags have the power to raise social consciousness about the exploitation of marginalized communities, to give them a platform that influences public discourse, and to ultimately change the status quo. Notably, “#MuteRKelly” was … Continue reading Analysis: The Movement that Cancelled R. Kelly

The Backlash Against “Karen” Memes is Peak White Feminism

By Stephanie Younger •  In late January, during my break in between college lectures, I was scrolling through my Facebook news feed when I suddenly came across a blog post, in which the author, a white woman, claims that “Karen” memes are “misogynistic,” and make white women feel “marginalized,” and “invisible,” and as though their … Continue reading The Backlash Against “Karen” Memes is Peak White Feminism

Why This New Black Female Voter is not “Voting Blue No Matter Who”

By Stephanie Younger •  When I learned that 2020 presidential candidate Joe Biden won 10 states on Super Tuesday on March 3rd, I couldn’t help but think of his political legacy of fighting for segregation, and enforcing the criminalization of Black and Brown people. Appalled by the amount of Virginians that chose Biden in this … Continue reading Why This New Black Female Voter is not “Voting Blue No Matter Who”

Analysis: The Ways we Talk About Gender Stereotypes Do not Represent the Struggles we All Go Through

By Stephanie Younger •  Do the ways we talk about gender stereotypes represent the struggles we all go through? In Katherine Toland Frith and Barbara Mueller’s article entitled, “Advertisements Stereotype Women” written for the book, “Advertising and Societies: Global Issues,” they write about how the media degrades women and girls. Gender stereotypes obviously affect women … Continue reading Analysis: The Ways we Talk About Gender Stereotypes Do not Represent the Struggles we All Go Through

Analysis: How Racial Profiling Affects Black and Brown Women and Youth

By Stephanie Younger •  Are all people in America served and protected by the law? In the documentary, “Profiled – The Mothers of Murdered Black and Latino Youth,” director Kathleen Foster utilizes the power of art, amplifies the voices of Black and Latin American women and youth, and directs attention to protest and dissent. This … Continue reading Analysis: How Racial Profiling Affects Black and Brown Women and Youth

Black Youth Have Been Combating Gun Violence for Generations

By Stephanie Younger •  I’d like to start this article by thanking Mobilizing Youth Project and Women’s March Youth Empower for inviting me to speak at the Town Hall For Gun Violence Prevention. At the town hall, I shared my story of being on the organizing committee of Richmond’s National School Walkout and conveyed why … Continue reading Black Youth Have Been Combating Gun Violence for Generations

An Open Essay About My Experiences with the White Moderate

By Stephanie Younger •  In Dr. Martin Luther King’s “Letter From a Birmingham Jail” (1963), he wrote, “…I have been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride towards freedom is not the White Citizens Counciler, or the Ku Klux Klanner, … Continue reading An Open Essay About My Experiences with the White Moderate

Havana Chapman-Edwards on Activism and Girl Power

BY STEPHANIE YOUNGER •  7-year-old student activist Havana Chapman-Edwards (@TheTinyDiplomat) was the only student at her school to participate in the national school walkout to honor the victims of the 1999 Columbine school shooting. Her story went viral and captured the attention of CNN, Refinery29, The Washington Post, USA Today and more. With her honorees … Continue reading Havana Chapman-Edwards on Activism and Girl Power

‘Justice Parade For Youth’ Organized by Youth

BY STEPHANIE YOUNGER •  On Saturday Nov. 3rd, the Richmond community joined RISE For Youth, Art 180, and Performing Statistics, to “honor the voices, dreams and demands of youth affected by the school-to-prison pipeline.” The community, composed of speakers, dancers, singers, poets and other performers gathered outside of Hotchkiss Community Center to raise awareness about … Continue reading ‘Justice Parade For Youth’ Organized by Youth

Review: The Hate U Give

BY STEPHANIE YOUNGER •  A movie entitled, The Hate U Give—based on the acclaimed YA novel by Angie Thomas, debuts with a then 9-year-old Starr Carter (Amandla Stenberg), her younger brother Sekani (TJ Wright), who was one year old, and her older half-brother Seven (Lamar Johnson), who was ten, being given “the talk” by their … Continue reading Review: The Hate U Give

“Lift Us Up, Don’t Push Us Out:” Art 180 Opens Exhibition About School Push-Out

BY STEPHANIE YOUNGER •  Art 180 is an RVA-based organization that gives marginalized young people the opportunity to create change by expressing themselves through music, poetry, dance, and more. On Friday, October 5th, they opened “Lift Us Up! Don’t Push Us Out!” a mixed-reality exhibit that raises awareness about the school-to-prison pipeline, the youth and … Continue reading “Lift Us Up, Don’t Push Us Out:” Art 180 Opens Exhibition About School Push-Out

The Story Behind the Hashtag “#HelpNotDeath”

BY STEPHANIE YOUNGER •  At an art build for the National March For Justice and Reformation for Marcus-David Peters, I met Princess Blanding, a co-founder of Justice and Reformation to interview her about how the murder of her brother, Marcus-David Peters motivated her to take action. The Richmond Police Department (RPD) recently acquitted the cop … Continue reading The Story Behind the Hashtag “#HelpNotDeath”

Patrisse Khan-Cullors on Art, Intersectionality, and Her Memoir

BY STEPHANIE YOUNGER •  On June 11, I had the unforgettable experiences of meeting Patrisse Khan-Cullors (@Osopepatrisse), briefly after she accepted the “Next Generation Award” at the ACLU National Membership Conference. I recently interviewed the artist, organizer, and writer, who founded Dignity and Power Now, co-founded Black Lives Matter, and recently authored her memoir, “When … Continue reading Patrisse Khan-Cullors on Art, Intersectionality, and Her Memoir

Why I Didn’t Participate in the National School Walkout

BY STEPHANIE YOUNGER •  I am writing this as a Black student activist who was turned away and excluded from speaking by the student organizers of the Virginia National School Walkout Protest, that took place at Brown’s Island in Richmond, Virginia yesterday; on the 19th anniversary of the Columbine school shooting. Weeks ago, I was … Continue reading Why I Didn’t Participate in the National School Walkout

20 Things Black Girls Should Never Have to Hear or Experience

BY STEPHANIE YOUNGER •  The following list is based on real micro-aggressions and instances of racism I’ve experienced, written on the mixed-media piece I created in a VCU Future Studio program at the VCU Arts’ Department of Sculpture + Extended Media, and exhibited at Art 180. It symbolizes how I have transcended the misogyny and … Continue reading 20 Things Black Girls Should Never Have to Hear or Experience

14 Black Girls, Women & Non-Binary People Every Womanist Should Know About

By Stephanie Younger •  Many institutions fail to educate Black History and Women’s History from the most marginalized voices in the Black community. Black women, girls and non-binary people are often discredited for our contributions to the feminist movement and the civil rights movement. Civil Rights is often centered around cisgender and heterosexual Black men, … Continue reading 14 Black Girls, Women & Non-Binary People Every Womanist Should Know About