Stratified Reproduction in Medicine

"Is it really that these are IVF pregnancies and not that they are commonly white women who carry these pregnancies? Given the maternal mortality rate which disproportionally impacts Black women regardless of socioeconomic status, that is unlikely," - Micaela Stevenson By Micaela Stevenson • This was re-published on Afroféminas on October 18, 2021• “Stratified reproduction” … Continue reading Stratified Reproduction in Medicine

A Conversation with Taylor Scott, Founder of RVA Community Fridge

Alex Scribner/VPM News By Teresa Younger and Stephanie Younger • We are grateful to have a conversation with Taylor Scott for a conversation that was centered on the RVA Community Fridges, which she founded in 2020. The community fridge is a concept and a place where communities are given access to share and collect food. … Continue reading A Conversation with Taylor Scott, Founder of RVA Community Fridge

Teach-In: In Commemoration of Black August

Thank you to everyone who participated in last week's Black August commemoration teach-in! Facilitated by Micaela Stevenson and Stephanie Younger, we were joined by Ruby Sales to discuss her involvement in the Southern Freedom Movement, and attendees to share what Black August means to all of us, what we've been doing to honor Black resistance, … Continue reading Teach-In: In Commemoration of Black August

Stereotypes Make it Difficult for Black Women to Get Adequate Mental Heath Care

Photo courtesy unknown; seen on Afroféminas Magazine By Elvira Swartch Lorenzo •  Originally published on Afroféminas Magazine • When I made the decision to seek therapy, I initially had two opposite reactions. The first was an initial enthusiasm to take care of myself and hopefully become a better person. That feeling was quickly replaced by panic: I knew immediately that … Continue reading Stereotypes Make it Difficult for Black Women to Get Adequate Mental Heath Care

How Politics Should Reflect on the Colonial Past and Why it is So Important

"Spain has a long way to go in recapitulating its colonial past. It is important to accept what the exploitation of certain countries meant for the history of Spain as well as to contemplate the impact that Spanish settlement had on the former colonies. Above all, it is necessary to contemplate this from various points … Continue reading How Politics Should Reflect on the Colonial Past and Why it is So Important

A Review of “The Tiger Flu” by Larissa Lai

"In the concluding scene, Lai offers a return to the situated and subjugated knowledges that emerge from spaces of exclusion and oppression as she depicts previous Saltwater Flats resident Kora as a tree with new Grist sisters excitedly gathering under her branches to hear stories of a time before. This moment, a recovery of obscured … Continue reading A Review of “The Tiger Flu” by Larissa Lai

Bisi Ideraabdullah of the Imani House On Self-Help and Community help

Francis Miller/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images By Teresa Younger •  At Black Feminist Collective, we are celebrating Imani House, an organization that allows Black people to empower themselves through the provision of education, information and support services in the United States and Liberia, West Africa. Imani House is a good example of work in action. IHI … Continue reading Bisi Ideraabdullah of the Imani House On Self-Help and Community help

A Conversation with Ruby Sales

Nikki Kahn/Getty Images By Stephanie Younger • At the Katie Geneva Cannon Center for Womanist Leadership (KGCCWL) Virtual Spring Conference, I had the unforgettable experience of interviewing Ruby Sales, a freedom fighter, theologian, and founder of the SpiritHouse Project, an inner-city mission dedicated to Jonathan Daniels, who was murdered, while shielding her from a deputy … Continue reading A Conversation with Ruby Sales

Dispute the Questions: Reflections on non-hegemonic feminism in Latin America

Art by Dawn Okoro, Roshi Tecnica Mixta By Mariana Álvarez Castillo •  Originally published on Afroféminas Magazine • Regarding the feminist commemoration dates, it is important to think about some of the discussions that have historically taken place within the movement, but that in the context of the recent 8M are shaken, deepened, and resumed. … Continue reading Dispute the Questions: Reflections on non-hegemonic feminism in Latin America

Bodies and Forcefulness: The experience of blackness in the work of Delphine Desane

Art by Delphine Desane By Mariana Álvarez Castillo •  Originally published on Afroféminas Magazine • Delphine Desane (B. 1988) places moments of her world in limbos of colors: from her experience as a Black woman in Europe, she brings situations, outfits, faces and hair to the canvas. With flat colored backgrounds and penetrating gazes, Delphine … Continue reading Bodies and Forcefulness: The experience of blackness in the work of Delphine Desane

The Movement Fighting for LGBTQ+ Liberation in Ghana

Ludovic Berton By Stephanie Younger • Last week, we spoke with Fatima Derby, a Ghanaian feminist thinker, writer and organizer, who stands for freedom, justice and equality. During our conversation via Instagram Live, we discussed the violence LGBTQ+ people in Ghana are experiencing, what influences homophobic and transphobic violence against queer and trans Ghanaians, and … Continue reading The Movement Fighting for LGBTQ+ Liberation in Ghana

10 Readings Authored by Black Feminists and Abolitionists

Art by Stephanie Younger. Flowers grown in Teresa Younger's Garden. Black Feminist Collective has a put together a collection of 10 articles authored by Black feminists and abolitionists. Black Feminism Offers a Path to Abolition, by Elizabeth Jordie Davies for Bitch Media Black Trans Thought Can Set Us Free, by George Yancy for Truthout The … Continue reading 10 Readings Authored by Black Feminists and Abolitionists

Prioritizing Promises over Pennies: The Exploitation of Black Trauma for Profit

Jazz Thompson/The Bristol Cable By Kayla Alexandria Dorancy •  In an effort to achieve what some may call “the American Dream”, “reparations”, or just “getting theirs” — far too often do we see the main perpetrators and victims sharing the skin color and experiences. While the Black experience is not a monolithic one, the obstacles … Continue reading Prioritizing Promises over Pennies: The Exploitation of Black Trauma for Profit

No One Should ‘Enjoy Things’ at the Expense of Black Lives

We said abolish the prison industrial complex, and abolish the police, not "representation" of Black women who maintain those systems. Liberals have shown that Black women & girls only matter to them when they are oppressing other Black women. By Stephanie Younger • During an uprising in defense of Black life calling for the abolition … Continue reading No One Should ‘Enjoy Things’ at the Expense of Black Lives

Demonizing Human Movement: Criminalizing Immigrants in the United States

ClayToonz By Kayla Alexandria Dorancy •  Immigration is a universal practice by people that’s survived countless generations. The United States is known universally as a “melting pot” of culture and nationality. The inclusion and diversity of America is often embraced and is her most remarkable feature yet, internationally. Racial and ethnic variety is claimed to … Continue reading Demonizing Human Movement: Criminalizing Immigrants in the United States

New York City School Integration, An Urban Legend

Frank Hurley/NY Daily News Archive/Getty Images By Kayla Alexandria Dorancy •  If I were to ask you when New York City schools were integrated, what would you tell me?  1954 right? In fact, most people reference Brown versus The Board of Education and 1954 as when schools were integrated.  You're not wrong that in 1954 … Continue reading New York City School Integration, An Urban Legend

On the Ancestral Blessing of a Union

Jeff Grigg By Yemi Miller-Tonnet •   During the Civil War,Harriet Tubman spent some monthsin South Carolina’s low countryworking as a nurse for the Union armyand a laundress in a local wash house.Harriett mended wounds,changed gauze, scrubbed linens,and hung shirts on clothespins.She worked and waiteduntil orders from the north camefor her to form a spy ring.She … Continue reading On the Ancestral Blessing of a Union

Black Women and Girls Must Be Protected When We Are Alive

Alina Amador By Teresa Younger •  Content warning: Mentions of sexual violence and murder According to PEW Research Center, 235 Black people were shot to death by the police in 2019. The social movement against systemic racism and police violence continued in 2020, when believers around the world turned out following the May 25th Police … Continue reading Black Women and Girls Must Be Protected When We Are Alive

A Tale of Two Schools: Brooklyn College Edition

Photo courtesy of Marissa Mann By Marissa Mann • Refresh this page if the document doesn't load. Marissa Mann is a graduate student studying Speech-Language Pathology, who loves advocating and helping those who are in need and feel that they do not have a voice. Marissa's project highlighted their college experience during the COVID-19 pandemic … Continue reading A Tale of Two Schools: Brooklyn College Edition

What Alice Walker’s Definition of Womanism Taught Me in 2020

Eze Amos/Getty Images By Stephanie Younger • This article was re-published on Afroféminas Magazine on March 9, 2021 • 1. "From womanish.  (Opp. of “girlish,” i.e. frivolous, irresponsible, not serious.)  A black feminist or feminist of color.  From the black folk expression of mothers to female children, “you acting womanish,” i.e., like a woman.  Usually referring … Continue reading What Alice Walker’s Definition of Womanism Taught Me in 2020

A Hummingbird in the Palm: The Impact of Racism on Black Women’s Mental Health

Art by Stephanie Younger By Joyce Hounkanrin • This article was re-published on Afroféminas Magazine on June 29, 2021 • I hate mornings, yet I make a promise to myself to be up early. This morning I have no choice in the matter; someone is incessant in their attempts to reach me. The phone, which I keep … Continue reading A Hummingbird in the Palm: The Impact of Racism on Black Women’s Mental Health

How America Believed the Coronavirus Proved the Existence of Educational Inequity

Kayla Dorancy, Dr. Shawn Rux (The Real Pandemic) By Kayla Alexandria Dorancy •  Refresh this page if the document doesn't load.   Kayla Alexandria Dorancy is a recent graduate from Brooklyn College with a dual major BA in Philosophy and Political Science. Her focus study and researching consists of Black feminist theory, Black queer theory, … Continue reading How America Believed the Coronavirus Proved the Existence of Educational Inequity

Call-to-Action Update: Making Classrooms Equitable for Black and Brown Students in Virginia

Stephanie Younger By Skyla Bailey •  A Message to Virginia Department of Education (VDOE): Our history classes constantly teach students to think of European History when they think of “American” History. However, African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinx Americans are all part of America. Students of Color in Virginia want to learn more … Continue reading Call-to-Action Update: Making Classrooms Equitable for Black and Brown Students in Virginia

Black People Can’t Wait Every Four Years for Our Liberation

"During a global uprising in defense of Black life calling for the abolition of the police, liberals set the timetable for Black liberation by advising Black youth to "save it for after the election." When Black youth criticize Joe Biden for being an obstacle in the fight for our liberation, liberals silence us by telling … Continue reading Black People Can’t Wait Every Four Years for Our Liberation

Colleges Pretend to Care about Black People

Students celebrate the resignation of University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe amid allegations of racism. Photo courtesy of Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images. By James A. Perry Jr. •  The presence of elitism, capitalism, racism, and sexism are still ubiquitous within the apparatus of higher education. Higher education leaders need to move beyond rhetoric involving diversity, … Continue reading Colleges Pretend to Care about Black People

Call-to-Action: Making Classrooms Equitable for Black and Brown Students In Virginia

Stephanie Younger By Skyla Bailey •  As Black and Brown youth, we are tired of being considered second place, tired of having the education system fail us, and tired of being behind. We want to have all schools in Virginia to become equitable sanctuaries where every student can flourish. This petition is an essential call-to-action. … Continue reading Call-to-Action: Making Classrooms Equitable for Black and Brown Students In Virginia

Who is Solidarity For: Intra-Racial Solidarity for True Black Liberation

"Co-opting #SayHerName by sharing #SayHisName, pushing Black women (cis and trans) out of the conversation, ignoring the experiences of Black trans sex workers, and disregarding the voices of Black youth among other erasures stifle our ability to fully articulate the holistic violence of police and policing. Intra-racial solidarity building is extremely critical in articulating the facts … Continue reading Who is Solidarity For: Intra-Racial Solidarity for True Black Liberation

Reflections on Black Suffering, Grief and Re-imagining Freedom

Photo courtesy Unknown By Alexandra Brown • Originally published on Conversations With •  This reflective piece is a summary and critical analysis of a conversation between author, activist, and Afro-Pessimist philosopher, Professor Frank B. Wilderson III and Chairman of ‘Before Columbus Foundation’, Justin Desmangles. The discussion was entitled, ‘Re-Imagining the Black Body: Race, Memory, and … Continue reading Reflections on Black Suffering, Grief and Re-imagining Freedom

An Open Letter to the “What About”s

The Graphics Fairy By Tani Washington • It seems that every year, when Black activists speak up against large-scale inequity and systemic brutality against people of color, there are those who attempt to qualify this suffering through questions that point to the sufferings of other, usually non-marginalized, groups. This kind of response is a tactic … Continue reading An Open Letter to the “What About”s

The Fight For Black Lives will not be Palatable: On Co-Optation of Anti-Racism

Teresa Younger By Stephanie Younger • 10 days ago, I climbed up the Robert E. Lee Statue at a protest in Richmond, Virginia - the former capital of the Confederacy - and I was asked to speak in front of a large crowd of protestors. This was unplanned, and I have been grieving so heavily … Continue reading The Fight For Black Lives will not be Palatable: On Co-Optation of Anti-Racism

Maintaining Solidarity in the Black Community in the Face of COVID-19

Inclusion Solution By Giovanna Adams • We’ve all heard the sentiment over and over again. It feels good to hear and it feels good to say, doesn’t it? Those words are comforting and encouraging during a time when we are all facing uncertainty and insurmountable burdens. It really is a nice sentiment, but it’s difficult … Continue reading Maintaining Solidarity in the Black Community in the Face of COVID-19

The Movement that Cancelled R. Kelly

"#MuteRKelly has successfully helped bring to light the systemic failures that allowed Robert Kelly to abuse Black women and girls un-impeded for almost 30 years," - Stephanie Younger Jufu Han/Detroit Free Press By Stephanie Younger • Content warning: This article has mentions of sexual violence. Could a hashtag topple the career of a popular artist? … Continue reading The Movement that Cancelled R. Kelly

The Backlash Against “Karen” Memes is Peak White Feminism

""Karen" represents white women who direct their violence towards Black people while weaponizing their womanhood to mitigate their actions, but we should be referring to this as white violence. While white women have the privilege of simply being called a "Karen" for enforcing oppression against marginalized people, Black women and girls are dismissed as "angry," … Continue reading The Backlash Against “Karen” Memes is Peak White Feminism

Equity Beyond COVID-19: Why we Shouldn’t go Back to the Beginning

iStock/RuslanDashinsky By Giovanna Adams • Originally published on HB4 Diversity's Newsletter •  As a global health crisis has entered all of our lives, we’ve seen the impact on equity in education, challenges to our daily economics, and have only begun to see the ramifications on our psyches from social distancing and for some, social isolation. … Continue reading Equity Beyond COVID-19: Why we Shouldn’t go Back to the Beginning

The Long Legacy of Anti-Blackness within the Feminist Movement

https://www.instagram.com/p/BPi8TJyFJ5D/ https://twitter.com/saint_CHuBBZ/status/822940921847279617 Danny Hales/ACLU of Virginia By Stephanie Younger • This year, the Black Lives Matter chapter in Los Angeles, California was excluded by the Women’s March in LA. In an article for LA progressive, Melina Abdullah, the co-founder of Black Lives Matter LA, wrote an article detailing the harm caused by the Women’s March. … Continue reading The Long Legacy of Anti-Blackness within the Feminist Movement

The Mataculebra: The Ultimate Expression of Slavery in the Carnival of Tenerife

https://youtu.be/_VJPMGDLCwo Originally published on Afroféminas •  The capacity of Spain to normalize brutal acts with racist content, disguised as alleged anti-racist content never ceases to surprise us. This is the case of the Mataculebra perpetrated in Puerto de la Cruz de Tenerife. This video speaks for itself and we will not say more than that … Continue reading The Mataculebra: The Ultimate Expression of Slavery in the Carnival of Tenerife

Token

Deun Ivory/LLC By Summar McGee • I am a Black girl at a PWI.  So I get a lot of kudos.  The people congratulate me for “making it” out of poverty Through an “education”  and to as close to whiteness as I’ll ever be.  Summar McGee is a Black woman, student & writer from Mississippi.

How Gender Stereotypes Intersect with Anti-Black Racism

"Although racism and gender stereotypes are different kinds of biases, the way we address gender stereotypes doesn’t represent the struggles we collectively go through, especially the struggles of Black girls. Acknowledging intersectionality can keep Black girls from being stereotyped, pushed out of school, criminalized and incarcerated, in that order," -Stephanie Younger Teresa Younger By Stephanie … Continue reading How Gender Stereotypes Intersect with Anti-Black Racism

Is it Open Season on Natural Hair?

Teresa Younger By Teresa Younger •  Complete with unsolicited comments, touching attempts from strangers, and pressure to do away with your coils right now, or you risk the shame of being prevented from attending your graduation or losing gainful employment? Is natural hair controversy a real thing? How have generations dealt with this constant problem?  … Continue reading Is it Open Season on Natural Hair?

How the Mental Health Stigma Harms Black Youth

"Believe Black youth when we open up about our mental health, and accept us for who we are." Anonymous • Content Warning: Mentions of self-harm • In the Black community, talking down to, speaking poorly of, publicly humiliating and criminalizing Black youth as a whole is acceptable. In the Black community, body shaming, and devaluing … Continue reading How the Mental Health Stigma Harms Black Youth

Analysis: The Impact of Policing on Black and Brown Mothers and Children

Kathleen Foster By Stephanie Younger •  Are all people in America served and protected by the law? In the documentary, “Profiled - The Mothers of Murdered Black and Latino Youth,” director Kathleen Foster utilizes the power of art, amplifies the voices of Black and Latin American women and youth, and directs attention to protest and … Continue reading Analysis: The Impact of Policing on Black and Brown Mothers and Children

Queer Windows in Dembow Music

Portrait of La Shakata Astoa courtesy of Carlos Rodriguez By Princess Jiménez •  Originally published on Kultwatch • In the Dominican Republic, where supposedly moral society and the Church often espouse virulent homophobia and transphobia, an unusual alliance has appeared among the very poorest: singers and producers of popular music genre Dembow are working with queer … Continue reading Queer Windows in Dembow Music

An Excerpt from the E-Book, “The Therapeutic Alliance Handbook”

Traycee Truth By Traycee Truth • The following excerpt is from Traycee Truth’s e-book, The Therapeutic Alliance Handbook. Refresh this page if the document doesn't load. TrayCee Truth is a holistic civil servant, who holds a degree in social work and is currently working towards her master’s degree in advanced clinical social work. She has had … Continue reading An Excerpt from the E-Book, “The Therapeutic Alliance Handbook”

How The School System is Failing Black Students

"When a certain race and class of students gets funneled into a school system that is poorly funded, poorly staffed and poorly executed these children have a smaller chance of succeeding in life," - Sharayah Alkire By Sharayah Alkire •  Throughout American History systems have been built up to bring down Black people in many … Continue reading How The School System is Failing Black Students

The Role of Black Women in the Fight to Ratify the Equal Rights Amendment

Steve Helber/AP By Belan Yeshigeta •  Women have often been given the short end of the stick when it comes to equal rights, and it is no secret that African Americans are still prejudiced against to this day. The unique experience of being apart of both of these marginalized communities is one that is too … Continue reading The Role of Black Women in the Fight to Ratify the Equal Rights Amendment

Oppression Expression: Answering Zora Neale and Mother Lorde

Carl Van Vechten Jack Mitchell/Getty Images By Kristin Couch •  Reading Zora Neale Hurston and Audre Lorde led me to question myself about the stance I take on activism. These writers represent two polar ideals of being that I have struggled to find identification with. Zora Neale, my humanist hero who finds that everyone should … Continue reading Oppression Expression: Answering Zora Neale and Mother Lorde

An Excerpt From the Upcoming Novel “Of Cats and Women”

Brittany Jeter By Brittany Jeter • The following excerpt is from Brittany Jeter's upcoming novel, "Of Cats and Women." Refresh this page if the document doesn't load.   Brittany Jeter is a millennial Black American writer and educator from Southwest Philly. Her vision for the world is one in which everyone experiences sustained love, joy and … Continue reading An Excerpt From the Upcoming Novel “Of Cats and Women”

Mother Nature Does Not Discriminate. America Does

Huffington Post By Kayla Austin •  The aftermath of the natural disaster that was Hurricane Katrina is a display of the effects of environmental racism, redlining, and the neglection of people of color and those facing poverty. Katrina is one of the worst natural disasters to occur in the history of the United States. This … Continue reading Mother Nature Does Not Discriminate. America Does

We Safeguard the Peace the Enslaved Africans Dared Only Dream About

"We Safeguard the Peace the Enslaved Africans Dared Only Dream About." - Sarah Mathew In partnership with the Richmond Peace Education Center's annual essay contest 2019, "Remembering 1619 and Restoring Justice." By Sarah Mathew •  In 1619, my second great grandfather was kidnapped from his home in Angola and forced onto a Portuguese slave ship, … Continue reading We Safeguard the Peace the Enslaved Africans Dared Only Dream About

I am the Reality of my Ancestors’ Dreams for the Future

"I am the reality of their dreams for the future." - Gloria Amado In partnership with the Richmond Peace Education Center's annual essay contest 2019, "Remembering 1619 and Restoring Justice." By Gloria Amado •  400 years ago, my ancestors were kidnapped from their homes. Not only was there fear from their original captors, the Spanish, … Continue reading I am the Reality of my Ancestors’ Dreams for the Future

You are Never Too Little to Make a Difference

Leigh Vogel and Bethany Edwards (Dress: TheMaddyCo) By Havana Chapman-Edwards •  Speech at the Global Climate Strike on May 24, 2019 • My name is Havana Chapman-Edwards and I am 8 years old. I am here today because sometimes democracy looks like disagreement. I can’t sit in my classroom learning about our government when the government … Continue reading You are Never Too Little to Make a Difference

Black Mama’s Bail Out Day Is Freeing Incarcerated Black Women In Richmond, Virginia For Mother’s Day

Photo courtesy of S.O.N.G By Taneasha White, Brooke Taylor, Sarmistha Talukdar and Rebecca Wooden Keel of Southerners on New Ground •  Mother’s Day inspires images of family, bonding and care. May 12 is right around the corner, and many of us will be spending the day with our family. However, we forget that many Black … Continue reading Black Mama’s Bail Out Day Is Freeing Incarcerated Black Women In Richmond, Virginia For Mother’s Day

Our Liberation Must Be Centered In the Climate Justice Movement

Art by Stephanie Younger By Stephanie Younger •  Even though Black youth and youth of color - especially Indigenous youth - are the most affected communities by climate change, and have been combating this issue for a very long time, our voices are always excluded and left out of the conversation and action surrounding climate change. Similar to the fight against gun violence, … Continue reading Our Liberation Must Be Centered In the Climate Justice Movement

Review: MTV’s Documentary “White People”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_zjj1PmJcRM By Raina Cornish •  Racial profiling, “color blindness”, racist crimes, hatred. These are all issues that are making the world more divided than ever. People always say that we need to stop history from repeating itself, but how can we stop it if we continue to add fuel to the fire of racism and … Continue reading Review: MTV’s Documentary “White People”

Reflecting on Intersectionality in the Gun Violence Prevention Movement

"I strongly believe that “a seat at the table” isn’t enough. If you are not “eating,” then it is pointless. At the end of the day, a Black boy from Chicago and a white girl from Parkland need to be able to sit at a decision-making table and bounce back ideas on how to end … Continue reading Reflecting on Intersectionality in the Gun Violence Prevention Movement

Black Youth Have Been Combating Gun Violence for Generations

Erin Edgerton/VCU Capital News Service By Stephanie Younger •  This article was edited and re-published on Reforming America on April 2, 2019 •  Nearly a year ago, I was given the opportunity to deliver a speech at the March For Our Lives in Richmond, Virginia, which led to being quoted in multiple local news outlets, … Continue reading Black Youth Have Been Combating Gun Violence for Generations

For Black Girls Who Are Tired, but Rest Isn’t Enough

"Black Womanhood is only exalted if it’s in servitude for someone else. Why are almost all popular depictions have Black women having to be super-humans?" - Atari Gems By Atari Gems •  I'm exhausted. My mother tells me to slow down. Drink more water. Cut back on the things. Limit time on social media. Go … Continue reading For Black Girls Who Are Tired, but Rest Isn’t Enough

An Open Essay About My Experiences with the White Moderate

Howard Sochurek/Getty Images By Stephanie Younger •  In 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King wrote in his "Letter From a Birmingham Jail," "I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro's great stumbling block in his stride towards freedom is not the White Citizens Counciler, or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who … Continue reading An Open Essay About My Experiences with the White Moderate

Reconstruction Over Reformation: The Argument Against Liberal Feminism’s Relevance

"Where liberal feminism is shallow, intersectional feminism is deep; where liberal feminism lacks, intersectional feminism compensates; where liberal feminism seeks to reform, intersectional feminism seeks to reconstruct," - Roshaé M. Lowe By Roshaé M. Lowe •  Liberal feminism (often interchangeable with humanist feminism 1According to feministhumanists.org, a feminist humanist (or humanist feminist) “aggressively challenges the … Continue reading Reconstruction Over Reformation: The Argument Against Liberal Feminism’s Relevance

What You Need: My Experience Being Dismissed by my Doctor

Art by Mary Syloria By Fallen Matthew •  Life just keeps getting better and better for me. I have been afflicted with inexplicable symptoms and anxiety surrounding them for the past decade—all of which were either downplayed or dismissed by my MD, an upper-middle class white man generations removed from mine, despite a CT scan … Continue reading What You Need: My Experience Being Dismissed by my Doctor

Creating our Own Tables: Why I am More Included in the Womanist Movement

1. From womanish. (Opp. of “girlish,” i.e. frivolous, irresponsible, not serious.) A black feminist or feminist of color. From the black folk expression of mothers to female children, “you acting womanish,” i.e., like a woman. Usually referring to outrageous, audacious, courageous or willful behavior. Wanting to know more and in greater depth than is considered … Continue reading Creating our Own Tables: Why I am More Included in the Womanist Movement

Protect My Olive: How Policies Around Gender Binaries Affect the Representation of The Black Women’s Olive Within Family Planning Commercials

"Protect My Olive: How Policies Around Gender Binaries Affect the Portrayal of Black Womxns' Olives Within Family Planning Commercials," by Jameelah Lewis By Jameelah Lewis •  "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can never hurt me," these are just a few that every person bullied to stay strong, but the question in … Continue reading Protect My Olive: How Policies Around Gender Binaries Affect the Representation of The Black Women’s Olive Within Family Planning Commercials

5 Ways “Nice” Racism Shows Up in Progressive Communities

Photo courtesy of John Hamilton/Visual Editor By Daylisha Reid •  I grew up in a family with liberal viewpoints. As a child I had a basic, uninformed understanding of politics: Republicans are racist and influenced policies that benefited the wealthy, and kept the poor stagnant; Democrats are not racist, they are progressive human rights influencers … Continue reading 5 Ways “Nice” Racism Shows Up in Progressive Communities

What Armed Teachers and Police Presence Mean for Black Youth

Joe Raedle/Getty Images North America By Mei-Ling Ho-Shing •  On February 14, 2018, my school, Marjory Stoneman Douglas, came face-to-face with gun violence. On that day I was on the 2nd floor of the Freshman building, the same building we lost 17 of our MSD Eagles. I hid behind my teacher’s desk holding my classmate's … Continue reading What Armed Teachers and Police Presence Mean for Black Youth

#FreeCyntoiaBrown: Black Women Must be Centered in Conversations and Actions to End Slavery

Lacy Atkins/The Tennessean By Stephanie Younger • When she was 16, Cyntoia Brown lived in a hotel with an adult who sexually enslaved her, assaulted her, and threatened her. In 2004, another white man who sexually enslaved and abused Brown, and often intimidated her with guns. Out of fear, she shot him, was arrested, tried … Continue reading #FreeCyntoiaBrown: Black Women Must be Centered in Conversations and Actions to End Slavery

Havana Chapman-Edwards on Student Activism and Black Girl Magic

Jessica Holmes and Megan Landmeier Photography/Teen Vogue By Stephanie Younger •  This article was re-published on The Melanin Diary • 7-year-old student activist Havana Chapman-Edwards was the only student at her school to participate in the national school walkout to honor the victims of the 1999 Columbine school shooting. Her story went viral and captured … Continue reading Havana Chapman-Edwards on Student Activism and Black Girl Magic

Black Youth Standing for the Closure of Youth Prisons in Virginia

Mark Strandquist/Performing Statistics By Stephanie Younger •  On Saturday, November 3, the Richmond community joined RISE For Youth, Art 180, and Performing Statistics, to "honor the voices, dreams and demands of youth affected by the school-to-prison pipeline." The protestors, many composed of speakers, dancers, singers, poets and other performers gathered outside of Hotchkiss Community Center … Continue reading Black Youth Standing for the Closure of Youth Prisons in Virginia

“Lift Us Up, Don’t Push Us Out:” Art 180 Opens Exhibition About School Push-Out

Stephanie Younger By Stephanie Younger •  Art 180 is an RVA-based organization that gives marginalized young people the opportunity to create change by expressing themselves through music, poetry, dance, and more. On Friday, October 5th, they opened "Lift Us Up! Don't Push Us Out!" a mixed-reality exhibit that raises awareness about the school-to-prison pipeline, the … Continue reading “Lift Us Up, Don’t Push Us Out:” Art 180 Opens Exhibition About School Push-Out

The Movement Demanding Justice For Marcus-David Peters

Stephanie Younger By Stephanie Younger •  Last week, I met Princess Blanding at an art build for the upcoming National March For Justice and Reformation for Marcus-David Peters. I recently had a conversation with Blanding about demanding justice for her brother, Marcus-David Peters, who was murdered by the Richmond Police Department. Stephanie Younger: What is … Continue reading The Movement Demanding Justice For Marcus-David Peters

Patrisse Cullors on Art, Intersectionality, and Her Memoir

Dana Washington By Stephanie Younger •  On June 11, I met Patrisse Cullors briefly after she accepted the "Next Generation Award" at the ACLU National Membership Conference. Cullors is an organizer, writer and artist who co-founded Black Lives Matter Global Network and founded Dignity and Power Now. I recently interviewed the freedom fighter to reflect … Continue reading Patrisse Cullors on Art, Intersectionality, and Her Memoir

When Black Girls are Robbed of their Innocence

Art by Stephanie Younger By Stephanie Younger •  My painting in Art 180's gallery called "Everything is Connected" is about both the racism I experienced within the gun violence prevention community. The different colors represent the emotions I felt throughout the time I faced online harassment, and this piece has allowed me to express my … Continue reading When Black Girls are Robbed of their Innocence

Nupol Kiazolu on Womanism and Empowering Black Youth in the Fight for Black Lives

Agaton Strom Photography Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images North America By Stephanie Younger •  The murder of Trayvon Martin ignited a fire within a then 12-year-old Nupol Kiazolu "that [she's] never felt before." "I couldn’t fully articulate how I felt at the time, but I knew I was angry," she wrote in a post on Instagram. "A … Continue reading Nupol Kiazolu on Womanism and Empowering Black Youth in the Fight for Black Lives

Richmond Protestors Demand Justice for Marcus-David Peters

By Stephanie Younger •  This article was edited and re-published on the ACLU of Virginia on July 24, 2018 •  Virginia, we have a problem. We need to come to terms with our state’s history of the marginalization of the Black community. Virginia is where the first enslaved Africans were brought against their will. We … Continue reading Richmond Protestors Demand Justice for Marcus-David Peters

20 Things Black Girls Should Never Have to Hear or Experience

"20 Things Black Girls Should Never Have to Hear or Experience" by Stephanie Younger By Stephanie Younger •  The following list is based on my real experiences with misogyny, ableism and anti-Black racism, that I’ve written on a mixed-media piece I created in a VCU Future Studio program at the VCU Arts’ Department of Sculpture … Continue reading 20 Things Black Girls Should Never Have to Hear or Experience

It’s Important to Listen to Black Girls in the Fight Against Gun Violence

Church Hill People's News By Stephanie Younger •  This article was edited and re-published on the ACLU of Virginia on April 5, 2018 •  Today, I spoke at a March For Our Lives demonstration in Richmond addressing the fatal school shooting at Majory Stoneman Douglas High school in Parkland, Florida. My speech shed some light … Continue reading It’s Important to Listen to Black Girls in the Fight Against Gun Violence

Marching For Juvenile Justice with Art 180, Rise For Youth and Performing Statistics

Mark Strandquist/Performing Statistics By Stephanie Younger •  On the evening of Friday, November 3, hundreds in Richmond, Virginia attended the Juvenile Justice Parade, organized by RISE For Youth, Art 180 and Performing Statistics calling for the closure of youth prisons in Virginia. People began marching at City Hall, wearing silk-screen t-shirts that read, "Guide Us, … Continue reading Marching For Juvenile Justice with Art 180, Rise For Youth and Performing Statistics

Richmond Marches for Racial Justice

Richmond Grid Teresa Younger By Stephanie Younger •  On August 11-12, Klansmen, and Neo-Nazis attended the Unite the Right Rally, a demonstration against the removal of the Confederate monument. They attacked anti-racist counter-protestors, many comprised of anti-fascist, and Black Lives Matter activists. According to Al-Jazeera, the white supremacists' violence left 35 people injured; and a white … Continue reading Richmond Marches for Racial Justice

Book Review: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Illustration by Debra Cartwright By Stephanie Younger •  Originally published on HCPL TeenScene's Read & Review •   A 16-year-old Black teen who has witnessed the two fatal shootings of her childhood best friends, tries to make sense of the world. Starr Carter witnessed the first shooting when she was ten. It was a violent crime in … Continue reading Book Review: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

14 Black Girls, Women & Non-binary People Every Intersectional Feminist Should Know About

By Stephanie Younger •  Many institutions fail to educate people about Black liberation and the feminist movement from the narratives Black women, Black girls and Black non-binary people, who are often discredited for their work on the frontlines of Black liberation—which is often centered around cishet Black men, and mainstream feminism—which often centers cishet white … Continue reading 14 Black Girls, Women & Non-binary People Every Intersectional Feminist Should Know About